2018, June

Farm update – 6/10/2018

After nearly five months in operation, we’re just about ready to close down  the greenhouse for summer. Now that we have a germination heating mat, we’ll probably start planting up to a month earlier to give things like broccoli and cauliflower a longer greenhouse growing period before being planted outside. That means for the next six months or so, there will be one fewer morning chore, watering the greenhouse seedlings, which will be a welcome break and a definite sign of the transition of seasons.

The very last plants in the greenhouse are a few sweet potatoes and some basil seedlings. Two rows of sweet potatoes and one final bed of basil were planted today, and we’ll hold on to a few surplus seedlings in case there are any casualties this week. Otherwise, planting is complete for summer, not to resume until late September/early October.

Summer veggies are producing more and more every day. We’re excited that our tomatoes are finally getting ripe! We’re picking a good handful a day, but know that soon it’ll be many, many times more! More varieties of peppers are ripening and finding their way into pepper medleys: Marconi, Anaheim, sweet banana, green and purple bell, and jalapeno. The lunchbox snacking peppers, the first time we’ve grown them, aren’t far behind. I picked one precocious orange one this week, and it was great! Sweet and nearly seedless. The eggplant are nearly ready too, in fact some may be harvested later this week. Our first row of okra is producing, and hopefully the other rows aren’t too far behind.

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Despite the heat and intermittent rain, we managed to weed everything top to bottom, so the garden and field are looking quite nice. It’s that time of year when it’s so easy to have weeds overtake the vegetables, so I’m happy we’ve been able to stay on top of it.

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1 thought on “Farm update – 6/10/2018”

  1. Wow! While everyone else in North America seems to be behind our schedule (I do not hear much out of Arizona or New Mexico), your eggplants are exquisite! We have nice early warmth here, but it does not get very hot, and it does not stay warm over night. I do not know why eggplants are as popular here as they are here, although we do have a certain ethnic influence. I stopped growing them year ago. The few fruits we got were quite good, but it was too much work for only a few fruits.

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